UNDERSTANDING NUTRITION PANELS

Providing you eat a wide range of low FODMAP fruit, vegetables, protein and carbohydrates on a daily basis you shouldn’t need to worry about your nutritional needs.

We provide nutrition panels with each low FODMAP recipe so you and your dietitian can make sure you are meeting your daily nutritional needs as required. Remember that your nutritional needs may vary depending on your health and age, as well as lifestyle factors, please consult a dietitian to find out what is right for you.

What are the daily nutrition percentages based on?

Nutrition data for each recipe has been generated using Nutritics. Nutrition percentage information on the A Little Bit Yummy website is based on the nutrition needs of a middle aged female consuming 2000 calories per day. The nutritional guidelines used for each nutrition component are outlined below.

Calories

Calories represent the energy that comes from our food and drink. This energy fuels our bodies’ need to grow, repair and do physical exercise (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015).

A calorie target of 2000 calories per day is used in the calorie percentage.

Fat

Fat is an essential nutrient that helps supply our bodies with omega 3 & omega 6, as well as helping us absorb fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015b; NVR, 2015). Some fats like monounsaturated fats (found in olive oil, canola oil, nuts, avocado and lean meats) and polyunsaturated fats (found in oily fish, walnuts, lean red meat, sunflower seeds, sesame, and soybeans) can have a positive impact on heart health, eye and brain function (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015b).

Other fats, like saturated fat and trans fat, should be minimised when possible to reduce the risk of heart disease (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015b).

The Australian Daily Intake Guide recommends that an adult with a 2000 calorie intake consumes less than 70g of fat per day (DAA, 2016). This figure has been used for the fat percentage in the nutrition panel.

Saturated Fat (Saturates)

Saturated fats increase our bad cholesterol (LDL), and should only be eaten in small amounts (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015b). You can find saturated fats in foods like butter, cheese, meat fats, meat products, biscuits, cakes, hard margarines, and coconut oil (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015b).

The Australian Daily Intake Guide recommends that an adult with a 2000 calorie intake consumes less than 25g of saturated fat per day (DAA, 2016). This figure has been used for the saturates percentage in the nutrition panel.

Carbohydrates (Carbs)

Our main sources of carbohydrates include vegetables, fruit, bread, cereals, rice, pasta, sugar, milk and yoghurt (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015c). Carbohydrates are important as they provide the main energy source in our diet (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015c).

The Australian Daily Intake Guide recommends that an adult with a 2000 calorie intake consumes around 310g of carbohydrates per day (DAA, 2016). This figure has been used for the carbohydrates percentage in the nutrition panel.

Sugars

Sugars occur naturally in a wide range of foods from fruit and vegetables right through to grains. Sugars are also added to manufactured foods or recipes (these are called ‘free sugars’ or ‘added sugars’). Some of these added sugars include white sugar, brown sugar, maple syrup, golden syrup, rice malt syrup and fruit juice.

No percentage for sugars is currently shown, as many of the sugars are naturally occuring within fruits, vegetables and grains. In the future we will tell you how many teaspoons of added sugar are in each serve.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations for free or added sugars are that you should consume less than 10% of your total energy (World Health Organisation, 2015). This means an adult consuming around 2000 calories per day should consume no more than 55 grams or 13 teaspoons of sugar per day. The WHO further recommends that free or added sugar should be reduced to 5% of total energy consumed if possible (World Health Organisation, 2015). Check the ingredient list to see if added sugars have been used in the recipe.

Protein

Protein is another source of energy that helps our bodies to grow and repair muscles, hair, nails, skin and organs (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015d). Our protein needs depend on age, activity levels, and general health.

The Australian Daily Intake Guide recommends that an adult with a 2000 calorie intake consumes around 50g of protein per day  (DAA, 2016). This figure has been used for the carbohydrates percentage in the nutrition panel.

Fibre

Fibre can help keep us regular as well as protect our bodies against bowel disorders and heart disease (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015e; NRV, 2014a). For examples of high fibre foods check out our guide for Low FODMAP Fibre Sources.

The general recommendations for fibre are 25mg per day for females and 30mg per day for males (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015e; NRV, 2014a).

We currently do not provide a percentage showing if you are meeting your daily fibre needs. This is because some medical conditions can change the amount and type of fibre you need. Talk to your dietitian about what is right for you.

Salt

Sodium is commonly found in our food as salt. Our bodies need a small amount of sodium to keep our fluids and electrolytes balanced (NRV, 2014b). However too much salt can increase our risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and raised blood pressure (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015f).

Our nutrition salt percentage is calculated based on the World Health Organisation’s suggested dietary target, for chronic disease prevention, of 1600mg of sodium per day (this is the upper limit) (NRV, 2014b). To convert sodium into salt, the sodium amount is multiplied by 2.5 (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015f). This means 1600mg of sodium is the equivalent of 4000mg or 4g of salt per day.

Iron

We need iron to produce haemoglobin for our blood to help carry oxygen around our body (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015g; NRV, 2014c). Some of us don’t consume enough iron in our diets. To help you monitor this we record how much iron is in our recipes.

The iron nutrition percentage is calculated using the recommended daily intake (RDI) of 18mg per day for a middle aged female (NRV, 2014c).

Calcium

Calcium helps our bodies build healthy bones and teeth, as well as helps our hearts function (NRV, 2014d). Calcium can be found in a range of foods from dairy products through to fortified soy and rice milks, tofu, sardines, some nuts (such as almonds), sesame seeds, broccoli, and fortified breakfast cereals (NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2015h).

The calcium nutrition percentage is calculated using the recommended daily intake (RDI) of 1000mg per day for a middle aged female (NRV, 2014d).

References

  1. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Energy. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015a. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/Nutrients/energy. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9FalcwY)
  2. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Fat. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015b. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/Nutrients/fat. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9FkNHDr)
  3. DAA. Dietary Intake Guide. Dietitians Association of Australia. Retrieved from: http://daa.asn.au/for-the-public/smart-eating-for-you/nutrition-a-z/daily-intake-guide/ Retrieved on 2016-21-10
  4. Nutrient Reference Values. Fats: Total fat & fatty acids. Nutrient Reference Values For Australia & New Zealand. 2014-04-09. Retrieved from:https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/fats-total-fat-fatty-acids. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9J06AQY)
  5. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Carbohydrates. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015c. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/Nutrients/carbohydrates. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9GUcTmF)
  6. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Protein. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015d. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/Nutrients/protein. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9H1Ug9e)
  7. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Fibre. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015e. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/Nutrients/carbohydrates/fibre. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9HJZusg)World Health Organisation. Guideline: Sugars intake for adults and children. 2015. Retrieved from http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/149782/1/9789241549028_eng.pdf?ua=1 Retrieved on: 2016-26-10.
  8. Nutrient Reference Values. Dietary Fibre. Nutrient Reference Values For Australia & New Zealand. 2014-04-09a. Retrieved from: https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/dietary-fibre. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9I8YwFx)
  9. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Sodium. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015f. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/minerals/sodium. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9HRDln0)
  10. Nutrient Reference Values. Sodium. Nutrient Reference Values For Australia & New Zealand. 2014-04-09. Retrieved from: https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/sodium. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9IcmZjD)
  11. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Iron. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015g. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/minerals/iron. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9Hax9Wo)
  12. Nutrient Reference Values. Iron. Nutrient Reference Values For Australia & New Zealand. 2014-04-09c. Retrieved from: https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/iron. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9IHWHCz)
  13. Nutrient Reference Values. Calcium. Nutrient Reference Values For Australia & New Zealand. 2014-04-09d. Retrieved from: https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/calcium. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9IoTJcP)

  14. NZ Nutrition Foundation. Calcium. NZ Nutrition Foundation. 2015h. Retrieved from: http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/minerals/calcium. Retrieved on: 2016-10-10. (Archived by WebCite® at http://www.webcitation.org/6l9HlPrNe